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1.09.2006

Marcelo Garcia No-Gi Seminar

Grainy picture of me and Marcelo GarciaThis weekend I went to a Marcelinho "Marcelo" Garcia seminar hosted by POW Kickboxing in Chicago, IL. It was a great time and I learned a lot, as a plug for Sensei Marcelo's fantastic jiu-jitsu skills I'd strongly recommend purchasing any or all of his video series. Another excellent resource is his Personal Submission special from Tatame (which he was kind enough to sign for me). Of course if he's ever within a couple hundred miles, make the trip. Notes on some general comments he made:
Situational
Everything depends on the situation, that is the action ("attacking") and reaction ("escaping"). Technique is applied as a function of the situation, within the ebb and flow of sparring or competing. His seminar showed a meshwork of situations provoked by one another.
Attack
If you are not attacking, you are defending, if your defending your playing catch up. No one wins by playing catch up. Regardless of your opponent, there is no reason to wait around for them to do something to you.
Simplicity
All of Marcelo's game is predicated on simplicity (well simple for him perhaps). That is a core understanding of physical basics and a dedication to technical fundamentals.
The Game
The only game that matter is your own. Yes, beg, borrow and steal what works and plug it in where it fits for you, but realize it within your own needs. Go and learn Marcelo's uniquely simple but universally effective strategies but they need to become part of what you do not simply what he does.
We started with fairly simple stretching, the only new one to me being sitting and putting the knees to the floor on either side. On to the technique:
Single Leg Sprawl Takedown
Partner is controlling your head with one hand, deny partner arm control and control partner's elbows. Think of it as psychological engagement, offer head control to gain arm control
  1. Wing partner's elbows and shoot, securing arms around partner's thigh. Lift leg (Marcelo used a low head position, rather than pectoral level head post)
  2. Quarter circle away from the outside line to inside while simultaneously sprawling to the floor. Drop partner into hole created by controlling leg.
Leg Drag To Rear Bear Hug Control
Being unable to take down with the single leg sprawl takedown:
  1. Use outside to inside quarter circle as above to unbalance.
  2. Follow with an outside to inside shoulder push to rotate back again and unbalance again.
  3. Repeat #1 and #2 until the right moment of unbalancing (kazushi), then shuck leg securing rear bear hug control. Hands at hips, head on spine.
A diagram of the the over under arm placement (circles) and clasped hands (white X)Rear Over-Under Control
Dominant hand works as overhook, nondominant as underhook. Overhook goes over shoulder and is clasped by the underhook which goes under armpit (circles in figures). The grip is palm of underhook to back of overhand. When clinching this grip pop the hands together and into the center of the chest at the nipple line (X in figure) hard and fast, it sounds like slapping or punching the chest. Your chest must be positioned so that your hands are also in the center of your chest at the nipple line. This allows tight enough control that putting the hooks is an option rather than a necessity for control. If your partner is taller than you, you must jump and fit hooks, thus ensuring your hands in the center of your chest.

Arm Drag (Pulls To Floor)
The perceived threat of a single leg lowers partner's hands almost to floor. Secure same side wrist control.
  1. Cross hand grips partner's triceps as you sit with one foot between partner's legs, upper body goes to floor, as you pull backwards, extending partner across floor.
  2. Use the your free leg to kick/lever your body up, no posting with free hand.
  3. Grab over-under rear control from top. Your thread leg may or may not be hooking depending on the explosiveness of the arm drag.
Arm Drag (Defends By Keeping Posture/Pulling Back Arm)
If your partner defends by remaining standing and pulling arm back on the arm drag, use this grip as a one handed pull up. Pop up and over to rear over-under position, inserting more anterior leg (overhook side) as hook.

Arm Drag (Defends By Running Past)
If your partner attempts to "run" past you on hands and knees release arm drag grip on triceps and turn, using opposite arm to hug near leg. Assert thigh control and standup, returning to single leg sprawl takedown. Note that the objective is to not wind up in your partner's guard so do not try to grab both legs.

Standing Rear Mount Takedown (the Ricco Solution)
If you have jumped to partner's back with the rear over-under control and hooks in place, try extending legs and pulling at an angle to bring partner back and to their side. Extension of the legs forces them erect so that they begin to fall backward because of your weight, the twist adds momentum but makes sure your partner doesn't land on you. Do not release over-under control or hooks.

Rear Over Under Grip To Hooks/Rear Naked Choke
Overhook side has hook inserted, roll partner to this side, and use underhook to secure same side wrist control. Pull control arm posteriorly and place behind back, insert hook over this arm, trapping it with your leg.
Alternatively on getting wrist control and pulled arm posteriorly, partner avoids hooks by folding knee to floor.
  1. Place arm behind back.
  2. Control with inward thigh pressure, foot on hip.
  3. Slide knee toward your head, increasing shoulder pressure.
  4. Take rear naked choke
Rear Bear Hug To Rear Mount
From rear bear hug control
  1. Jump up and place feet in the backs of the knees.
  2. Extend legs and let weight drag both you and partner to floor. Partner should fall between your legs, not crushing your face with back.
  3. Insert hooks and attack with rear naked choke.
Grainy picture of the no-gi group for Marcelo Garcia's seminar

1 comment:

Kurk said...

ha-ha. that's some serious bout. I wonder if it would really, really be hilarious if some boxer would wear nipple covers on a match. Ha-ha. That'd be awesome!